MBCN Supports Metastatic Breast Cancer Researchers at University of Chicago With Leadership Awards

November 12, 2015
MBCN's Shirley Mertz (left) and Katherine O'Brien (far right) with leadership award recipients Dr. Nanda and Dr. Chmura.

MBCN’s Shirley Mertz (left) and Katherine O’Brien (far right) with leadership award recipients Dr. Nanda and Dr. Chmura.

At a Metastatic Breast Cancer Forum held by the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center on October 27, 2015,  patients and caregivers heard from two University of Chicago clinicians, oncologist Dr. Rita Nanda and radiation oncologist Dr. Steven Chmura, who shared current and new approaches aimed at improving treatment outcomes for women who live with metastatic breast cancer, a currently incurable, but treatable form of breast cancer that ends the lives of 110 people every day and 40,000 lives annually in the United States.

At the conclusion of the presentations, Shirley Mertz, a metastatic breast cancer patient, and President of the Metastatic Breast Cancer Network (MBCN), an all-volunteer, non-profit, nationwide patient-led organization, noted that although metastatic breast cancer is responsible for virtually all breast cancer deaths, a recent analysis revealed that only seven percent of all government and privately funded grants from 2000-2013 focused on improving outcomes for those living with metastatic breast cancer. Breast cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death for women in the US, and it is the leading cause of cancer death for women globally. “We know research holds the key to changing those statistics,” said Mertz.

Mertz then announced that MBCN wants to support the ongoing research of Dr. Rita Nanda and Dr. Steven Chmura by presenting an  MBCN Research Leadership Award to each in the amount of $30,000. Mertz said that the awards are made possible from contributions sent to MBCN from individuals, families and work colleagues who want to honor or remember loved ones, colleagues, and friends with metastatic breast cancer.

Mertz noted that Dr. Nanda’s research has been directed toward the treatment of triple-negative metastatic breast cancer. She has sought to identify novel anti-tumor treatments, such as using the drug pembrolizumab, to activate the body’s immune system in these patients. Immunotherapy has been shown to improve patient outcomes in advanced lung cancer and advanced melanoma, and Dr. Nanda’s research advances knowledge about using immunotherapy in metastatic breast cancer. (Here’s Dr. Nanda’s triple negative presentation from MBCN’s 2012 national conference.)

Dr. Steven Chmura is leading a national team of radiation oncologists in a national Phase II/III open trial that randomizes breast cancer patients with only 1-2 metastases, called oligometastatic breast cancer, to compare survival outcomes in standard of care therapy with or without stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and/or surgical ablation. Mertz said the Research Leadership Award from MBCN insures that participating study sites can perform needed biomarker tests of study participants. Outcomes of the trial could impact how metastatic disease is treated in the future in a subset of patients. (Here is a copy of Dr. Chmura’s presentation: Chmura talk_10_27_15. For an overview of Dr. Chmura’s work, see this video from MBCN’s 2012 National Conference.)

ABOUT THE METASTATIC BREAST CANCER NETWORK

The Metastatic Breast Cancer Network, a national, not-for-profit organization, was founded in 2004 to raise awareness about the kind of breast cancer that is rarely discussed in the breast cancer support groups or the media—metastatic breast cancer. Unlike early stage breast cancer, in which cancer cells are confined to the breast, in metastatic breast cancer, cancer cells have traveled from the breast to other sites in the body. Led by patient advocates, MBCN has worked to offer education and information to patients and their caregivers through its website (mbcn.org); targeted brochures developed for the public and those newly diagnosed; and an annual conference for metastatic patients at major comprehensive cancer centers.

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