Metastatic Breast Cancer Researchers Address MBC Alliance Meeting This Week

February 1, 2016
Shirley Mertz is representing MBCN

Advocates, researchers, industry and government representatives are at the Alliance’s meeting, including MBCN’s own Shirley Mertz

 

Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance Research Task Force Meets Today in Dallas; Focus of Discussion is Improving Length and Quality of Life for People Living With Metastatic Disease

Dallas – February 1, 2016 – Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is cancer that originated in the breast but has spread to other parts of the body, such as liver, lung, bones and brain. It causes >40,000 deaths every year in the U.S., a number that has remained unchanged for three decades.  

This alarming fact is driving the advocate-led Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance (“the Alliance”) to convene 60 experts from patient advocacy, academia, industry and government to discuss barriers in MBC research and possible solutions to better coordinate and accelerate research and translation to help patients sooner.

“As a person living with MBC each day, I’m grateful for the scientists and experts who have taken time out of their busy schedules to help guide the Alliance in the most thoughtful directions for MBC research,” commented Shirley Mertz, President of the Metastatic Breast Cancer Network and Co-Chair of the Research Task Force.  

Dr. Danny R. Welch, Professor and Chair of Cancer Biology at the University of Kansas Cancer Center noted at the start of the meeting that “My career has been focused on research on metastasis and putting an end to breast cancer. I have never seen as much energy, collaboration and excitement to work together – across academic, patient advocacy, industry and government sectors- as I have by working with this Alliance.”  

“As Co-Chair of the Alliance Research Task Force, along with Shirley Mertz, we’ve been working with these experts for the last eight months [by phone and webinar] discussing barriers to MBC research,” said Stephanie Reffey, Managing Director, Evaluation and Outcomes at Susan G. Komen, today. “These prior meetings culminated in today’s “Think Tank” in Dallas, where we are devising specific, actionable projects the Alliance can lead to accelerate MBC research.”  

In 2014, the Alliance released its Changing the Landscape for People Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer Report, which analyzed 224 clinical trials, 2281 funded research grants, 7900 MBC patient responses to surveys and 175 literature articles on quality of life and epidemiological studies.  

“Our research of the scientific landscape found a number of gaps and challenges in lab research and clinical trials impeding progress in scientific research,” said Chair of the Alliance, Dr. Marc Hurlbert. “After today, the Alliance’s task is to now facilitate a cooperative effort to review the objectives from this meeting and develop actions that can be taken in the immediate term. Given the toll MBC takes on patients and their caregivers, we have a responsibility to waste no time acting on the direction from this important meeting.”  

Representatives at the meeting in Dallas include:
Advocate Nonprofits: Breast Cancer Research Foundation, BreastCancerTrials.org, Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation, Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Metastatic Breast Cancer Network, Patient Advocates In Research (PAIR), Research Advocacy Network, Susan G. Komen, Theresa’s Research Foundation  

Academic Institutions: Baylor College of Medicine, Broad Institute, Dana-Farber/ Harvard Cancer Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Institute of Cancer Research (UK), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, University of California San Francisco, University of Kansas Cancer Center, University of Michigan, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, University of Southern California, University of Washington School of Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
 

Government: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, National Cancer Institute
 

Industry: Eli Lilly and Company, Genentech, Novartis Pharmaceutical Corporation, Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development
 

About the Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance
The Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance is led by advocates and, since forming with 15 groups in October 2013, has grown to be the largest breast cancer alliance in the U.S. with 40 of the leading cancer charities, advocacy groups and individuals and pharmaceutical industry partners. The Alliance vision is to transform and improve the lives of people living with metastatic breast cancer. The Alliance’s work focuses on three outcomes:
1. Advancing progress in scientific research
2. Increasing understanding of the disease and access to information and support
3. Building awareness of how metastatic disease differs from early stage breast cancer
 

More information about the Alliance is available at www.mbcalliance.org
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mbcalliance/
Twitter: @mbcalliance #MBCResearch
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/mbcalliance


MBCN Supports Metastatic Breast Cancer Researchers at University of Chicago With Leadership Awards

November 12, 2015
MBCN's Shirley Mertz (left) and Katherine O'Brien (far right) with leadership award recipients Dr. Nanda and Dr. Chmura.

MBCN’s Shirley Mertz (left) and Katherine O’Brien (far right) with leadership award recipients Dr. Nanda and Dr. Chmura.

At a Metastatic Breast Cancer Forum held by the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center on October 27, 2015,  patients and caregivers heard from two University of Chicago clinicians, oncologist Dr. Rita Nanda and radiation oncologist Dr. Steven Chmura, who shared current and new approaches aimed at improving treatment outcomes for women who live with metastatic breast cancer, a currently incurable, but treatable form of breast cancer that ends the lives of 110 people every day and 40,000 lives annually in the United States.

At the conclusion of the presentations, Shirley Mertz, a metastatic breast cancer patient, and President of the Metastatic Breast Cancer Network (MBCN), an all-volunteer, non-profit, nationwide patient-led organization, noted that although metastatic breast cancer is responsible for virtually all breast cancer deaths, a recent analysis revealed that only seven percent of all government and privately funded grants from 2000-2013 focused on improving outcomes for those living with metastatic breast cancer. Breast cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death for women in the US, and it is the leading cause of cancer death for women globally. “We know research holds the key to changing those statistics,” said Mertz.

Mertz then announced that MBCN wants to support the ongoing research of Dr. Rita Nanda and Dr. Steven Chmura by presenting an  MBCN Research Leadership Award to each in the amount of $30,000. Mertz said that the awards are made possible from contributions sent to MBCN from individuals, families and work colleagues who want to honor or remember loved ones, colleagues, and friends with metastatic breast cancer.

Mertz noted that Dr. Nanda’s research has been directed toward the treatment of triple-negative metastatic breast cancer. She has sought to identify novel anti-tumor treatments, such as using the drug pembrolizumab, to activate the body’s immune system in these patients. Immunotherapy has been shown to improve patient outcomes in advanced lung cancer and advanced melanoma, and Dr. Nanda’s research advances knowledge about using immunotherapy in metastatic breast cancer. (Here’s Dr. Nanda’s triple negative presentation from MBCN’s 2012 national conference.)

Dr. Steven Chmura is leading a national team of radiation oncologists in a national Phase II/III open trial that randomizes breast cancer patients with only 1-2 metastases, called oligometastatic breast cancer, to compare survival outcomes in standard of care therapy with or without stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and/or surgical ablation. Mertz said the Research Leadership Award from MBCN insures that participating study sites can perform needed biomarker tests of study participants. Outcomes of the trial could impact how metastatic disease is treated in the future in a subset of patients. (Here is a copy of Dr. Chmura’s presentation: Chmura talk_10_27_15. For an overview of Dr. Chmura’s work, see this video from MBCN’s 2012 National Conference.)

ABOUT THE METASTATIC BREAST CANCER NETWORK

The Metastatic Breast Cancer Network, a national, not-for-profit organization, was founded in 2004 to raise awareness about the kind of breast cancer that is rarely discussed in the breast cancer support groups or the media—metastatic breast cancer. Unlike early stage breast cancer, in which cancer cells are confined to the breast, in metastatic breast cancer, cancer cells have traveled from the breast to other sites in the body. Led by patient advocates, MBCN has worked to offer education and information to patients and their caregivers through its website (mbcn.org); targeted brochures developed for the public and those newly diagnosed; and an annual conference for metastatic patients at major comprehensive cancer centers.


MBCN Supports Metastatic Breast Cancer Researchers With Total Of $100,000 In Awards

April 14, 2015

Editor’s Note: Here’s our press release announcing MBCN’s 2015 research grants.  Two weeks ago, en route to participate in an FDA public meeting, three members of MBCN’s board had the opportunity to meet with Dr. Ewald and his team at Johns Hopkins. We’ll share our impressions of that visit in our next installment. Stay tuned!

Patient Advocate Group Selects Johns Hopkins’ Dr. Andrew Ewald and Baylor’s Dr. Matthew Ellis as 2015 recipients of its Metastatic Breast Cancer Research Leadership Awards

 

 April 10, 2015NEW YORKThe Metastatic Breast Cancer Network (MBCN) announced the 2015 recipients of its Metastatic Breast Cancer Research Leadership Awards: Dr. Andrew Ewald, associate professor in the Departments of Cell Biology and Oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Dr. Matthew Ellis, the director of the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine.

The Metastatic Breast Cancer Network (MBCN), an all-volunteer, patient-led organization, has long advocated for more focused metastatic breast cancer research that improves outcomes in the clinic for patients with metastatic breast cancer, an incurable disease that ends the lives of 108 people every day of the year.

“In 2014, MBCN made a commitment that all memorial contributions made to MBCN would go to funding metastatic research,” said Shirley Mertz, President. “We are pleased to present leadership awards of $50,000 each to two individuals whose work contributes significantly to understanding basic knowledge about the process of metastasis and to improving how patients are treated.”

Mertz, living with metastatic breast cancer since 2003, noted that although metastatic breast cancer is responsible for virtually every breast cancer death, it receives only a tiny percentage of the billions dedicated to breast cancer research. “MBCN is a founding member of The Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance,” Mertz said. “The Alliance’s Metastatic Breast Cancer Landscape Analysis released in October 2014 found that metastatic focused research made up only 7% of the $15 billion invested in breast cancer research from 2000 to 2013 by the major governmental and nonprofit funders from North America and the United Kingdom. Breast cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death for women in the US, and it is the leading cause of cancer death for women globally. We know research holds the key to changing those statistics—we are proud to support the work of Drs. Ewald and Ellis.”

Improving Knowledge About Metastasis: Dr. Andrew Ewald, Assistant Professor in the Departments of Cell Biology and Oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Ewald is an interdisciplinary cell and cancer biologist. His laboratory, made up of basic science and medical trainees working in collaboration with engineers and clinicians, pioneered the development and use of 3D culture techniques to capture and analyze in real-time the growth and invasion of breast cancer tumor cells. This work is providing deeper insights into the biology of metastasis. Dr. Ewald’s work is complex, and yet he is able to explain his work in a way that patients can understand, as this video demonstrates (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gezIo3p2dl8).

AndrewEwald

Watch Dr. Ewald’s amazingly easy-to-understand explanation of metastasis and his work.

“Breast cancer patients of all stages are shocked to learn that after 30 years of breast cancer research, scientists cannot fully explain how and why breast cancer cells leave the breast and travel to distant organs, particularly many years after successful treatment for early stage disease,” said Mertz. “Unfortunately, this happens to about 30% percent of early-stage patients—and we don’t know why. How can we optimally treat the disease if we do not understand the processes that caused its spread?”Dr. Ewald believes research that seeks to understand and describe how cancer cells learn to make connections to other nearby cells, travel through local tissues and the blood stream, and then establish themselves as a new tumor in the bone, lung, liver or brain will lead to new strategies and treatments to control or eliminate cancer cells from accomplishing these steps to metastatic spread and ultimately improve outcomes for individuals with metastatic breast cancer.“We applaud Dr. Ewald on his important and challenging work in cell and cancer biology,” Mertz said. “MBCN and its members will continue to follow future developments in his research.”
Improving Treatments For Metastatic Patients: Dr. Matthew Ellis, Director of the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine
Dr. Matthew Ellis is both an oncologist and scientist who has championed the cause of metastatic breast cancer patients for well over a decade. Currently, Dr. Ellis is the director of the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine. He was recruited from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis where from 2010 to 2014 he was a professor of medicine and head of the section of breast oncology. He had also served as a faculty member there since 2003.While at Washington University Dr. Ellis gathered a large resource of patient derived xenografts (tumors taken directly from the patient and studied in animals) and these became excellent resources for testing new therapies and understanding treatment resistance.

His work to develop these models focused on estrogen receptor positive breast cancer and these patient derived xenografts will now complement similar efforts underway by Baylor Smith Breast Center researchers with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

Dr. Ellis, a pioneer in breast cancer genomics, has been instrumental in developing a Genome Atlas and Therapeutic Road Map for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Most recently he has found that metastatic breast tumors initially positive for the estrogen receptor frequently harbor mutations and translocations in the receptor that render the tumor resistant to endocrine therapies used to block estrogen. Several laboratories are now trying to develop new drugs that will block these mutant receptors.

“MBCN acknowledges Dr. Ellis’s leadership in identifying groundbreaking new information about mutations in breast cancer and their clinical relevance. His work in this area has the potential to bring precision medicine to metastatic breast cancer patients and, hopefully, with it, longer survival. (Hear Dr. Ellis discuss his work here (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCCPhAHbgpI).)

Having decoded breast cancer genomes we must now annotate this massive amount of data, says Dr. Ellis.

Having decoded breast cancer genomes we must now annotate this massive amount of data, says Dr. Ellis.

“The Metastatic Breast Cancer Network acknowledges and thanks the individuals, organizations and private companies whose donations to MBCN on behalf of or in memory of loved ones and friends with metastatic breast cancer made these research leadership awards possible,” Mertz said. “We are confident the awards will advance the work of Dr. Ewald and Dr. Ellis.”

 

ABOUT THE METASTATIC BREAST CANCER NETWORK

The Metastatic Breast Cancer Network, a national, not-for-profit organization, was founded in 2004 to raise awareness about the kind of breast cancer that is rarely discussed in the breast cancer support groups or the media—metastatic breast cancer. Unlike early stage breast cancer, in which cancer cells are confined to the breast, in metastatic breast cancer, cancer cells have traveled from the breast to other sites in the body. Patients with metastatic disease are in constant treatment and must deal with the harsh reality that their disease is chronic, progressive and ultimately fatal. Led by patient advocates, MBCN has worked to offer education and information to patients and their caregivers through its website (mbcn.org); targeted brochures developed for the public and those newly diagnosed; and an annual conference for metastatic patients at major comprehensive cancer centers.